CHLOE TYE reviews Phaedra I— at Tristan Bates Theatre. Phaedra, the story of a woman tormented by Aphrodite into desiring and pursuing her step-son, was reimagined in this bold new production written and directed by Avra Sidiropoulou. Reworking Euripides, Seneca and Racine, this one woman show remained loyal to the original story but relayed it in an experimental and artistic performance. Phaedra I— translated the tale onto the modern stage in a way that paid homage to the original while presenting it in a wholly new way, reworking it for a modern audience. Avra Sidiropoulou brought this ancient tale into the realm of multimedia; Phaedra sat centre stage, her movement impeded by a billowing white dress, for the duration of the performance. The dress was constantly either illuminated by various coloured lights or projected onto with moving images. These projections were suggestive in their content but not so literal as to make either…Continue Reading

Phaedra I –

THEA RICKARD reviews I’m Woman at Tristan Bates Theatre. Anybody acquainted with the one-woman show aired in Friends will understand my apprehensions before arriving at I’m Woman, written and performed by Ana Daud. Thankfully, my uneasiness about the format was quelled, as this engaging, emotionally effective play was nothing like that. The men in the audience were instructed to sit on the left, with the women on the right, highlighting the play’s exploration of the differences between men and women, and how we perceive one another. Initially the play was a biographical examination of Daud’s parents’ respective addictions and how they influenced her becoming an addict herself. The play asked whether we are responsible for our own actions, or whether our parents or environment are to blame, furthermore implicating God as culpable for her experience, raising the issue of accountability. Daud, through Dmitri Acrish’s direction, directly confronted the audience with this question, breaking the fourth…Continue Reading

I’m Woman

SONIA CHUI reviews Dirty Laundry at Tristan Bates Theatre. The lights dim. A bell chimes. A single woman clothed in all black walks slowly into the room, ritualistically preparing an intimate space. The play begins with a prayer followed by a confession, with a booming voice from beyond the room not encouraging, but forcing the woman to confess her sins. Dirty Laundry, performed and written by Wallis Hamilton Felton, grapples with suffering and forgiveness. Weaving in traditional Irish songs, Hamilton Felton’s protagonist unearths the decades of abuse endured in the Magdalene Laundries in Ireland, otherwise known as Magdalene’s asylums. Operating from the 18th to the late 20th centuries, these were predominantly Roman Catholic religious institutes for ‘fallen women’ who were forced to spend the remainder of their lives repenting. This term was gradually used to encompass not just prostitution but a huge number of perceived ‘sins.’ An estimated 30,000 women…Continue Reading

Dirty Laundry