JEAN WATT speaks with four creatives who are making bespoke and up-cycled clothing to explore how fashion is slowing down, becoming more personal and more sustainable. Bespoke and commission based brands have been growing in popularity since the dawn of ‘slow fashion’, a term coined by Kate Fletcher in 2007. Combatting the wide-ranging negative effects of the fashion industry, this movement encourages more sustainable work practices and a more personal experience of buying and owning clothes. Artists and creators are up-cycling clothing and fabrics to create unique, handmade pieces which take in to account the resources and processes that go into their production. With many people stuck at home at the moment and feeling inspired to take up their own making as well as buying from smaller businesses, will this lockdown period speed up the progress of slow fashion? I spoke with four creatives about their work and their relationship…Continue Reading

Slowing Down

OSCAR CRABB is an artist in his third year at the Slade. Working mostly in textiles, he explores sustainable practices and uses art as a means for political discussion. JEAN WATT interviewed him about his practice, how he’s staying creative at the moment, and how this lockdown period might affect his future work.  What have you been working on at the moment?  I haven’t been able to make any of my usual work, so I’ve been mostly planning what I could do when I’m able to access my materials again, as they’re currently locked inside my studio at the Slade. In the meantime I’ve been doing some weaving at home on a loom, drawing and a bit of writing, just trying to keep up momentum.  And what else have you been doing day to day?  Cooking, lots of cooking, making cocktails…  Tell me more!  I’ve been trying out some new…Continue Reading

Interview: Oscar Crabb

ETHAN BURTON looks at the highlights from UCL MODO Fashion Society’s The Countdown Fashion Show. UCL MODO Fashion Society presented its first main show of the year, The Countdown Fashion Show, a collaboration with UCL Climate Action Society focusing on sustainability and the notion that ‘anything is possible.’ The palette of talent offered such designs; collections had consistently strong concepts, and each look revealed a fresh insight into the future of fashion. The clothes presented were either upcycled or produced of recycled materials, yet the garments appeared as if new. It called to remind us that we can no longer excuse our practices and lack of mindfulness towards the way we treat waste. One common theme threaded through many of the designs was a focus upon comfort. Designs all aimed to facilitate the wearer’s movement. This basis was spotted in the casual and utilitarian designs reproduced the double denim and…Continue Reading

MODO: Thread Count, Countdown