PHYLLIS AKALIN reviews Xavier Dolan’s eighth feature film, Matthias et Maxime. Xavier Dolan’s eighth film readopts many of the themes highlighted in his former works (Mommy, 2014, Laurence Anyways, 2012): the question of identity and sexuality, complicated mother-son relationships, and, most importantly, friendship. Yet, the repetition of these recurrent themes does not render their depiction any less sincere and raw. The film starts with a group of male friends in their early thirties spending the weekend together in a cottage by a lake in Québec. Erika, the sister of one of the friends, is directing a short movie for her film studies and needs two actors. Matthias and Maxime, close friends since childhood, reluctantly agree to help her without knowing that the scene requires that they share a kiss. After initially reacting with shock upon receiving instruction of this stage direction, they awkwardly assure Erika that the kiss does not pose a problem.…Continue Reading

Matthias et Maxime

LYDIA DE MATOS reviews Olivier Assayas’s latest film Non-Fiction. Concerned primarily with questions of the transition of media into the digital age, Non-Fiction (2019) is a film which attempts to establish itself as a portrait of modern times, attuned to the current zeitgeist of technological anxiety. However, an inherent contradiction is found in the way director Olivier Assayas chooses to present us with his view of the modern age. Despite marketing itself as a witty, farcical comedy of bored couples engaged in a zig-zagging pattern of affairs that would feel more at home in a Woody Allen film, Non-Fiction predominantly consists of conversations between a group of upper-middle class intelligentsia types; all of whom seem to be almost completely sealed off from the world around them. The farcical cheating simply ends up serving as background noise; a loosely contrived plot to string the series of conversations together.  Vincent Macaigne plays Léonard…Continue Reading

Non-Fiction