SHANTI GIOVANNETTI-SINGH considers censorship in the arts in light of the banning of Blue Story in Vue cinemas.  On the 8th of June 1995, explosive riots pulsated through the Parisian banlieue of Noisy-Le-Grand. Spurred on by the murder of Belkassem Delahbib, a young man tragically killed in a police chase, a wave of protestors took to the streets, shattering everything that crossed their paths. The upheaval continued deep into the following night, as the enraged communities burned with a hateful vengeance. Both mainstream media sources and various politicians attributed these events to Matthieu Kassovitz’s fifth film, La Haine, which was released the week before the riots began. Centred around police brutality and youth violence, many saw the events at Noisy-Le-Grand as a ‘copycat’ riot, inspired by the film’s explictically ‘hateful’ message towards an increasingly authoritarian police force.  24 years later, in Birmingham, a mass brawl erupted in the foyer of…Continue Reading

FEATURE: BLUE STORY